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TrinityCore

McAdams

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About McAdams

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  1. I rolled a docker container of 3.3.5 and have been testing it on various systems. I've been running a small private server for a few weeks (mostly for my wife and I), and I migrated the database to my docker instance so we could play on my test systems. I found that Linode's smallest node (1G ram, 1 core) is too small to even start the server on, but the next highest one (2G ram, 1 core) is perfectly adequate to run on, though @ 61% memory use. Not sure how it scales above 2 people, but that's worth watching if you want to open your server up to others. If you want to run a server at home, I spun an instance up on a tiny AMD T48E, thats a 2 core 1.4 GHz CPU with integrated "GPU" that comes bolted onto a mini-ITX board. I'm running Ubuntu 20.04 server edition, and 16 gigs of RAM (couldn't find less, sorry), and it's barely breaking a sweat. So all in all, you can get away with running TrinityCore on _really_ low spec hardware if you're aiming for a small server. Just some FYI if anyone's interested.
  2. @Thulium Ah ok, that's what the database build script is for. I need to put more time into running the rest of your stuff, as it will likely take care of even more things I need. Thanks for the tips - explains the missing runtimes. I'm not sure how much energy/time I have for this either, I get the feeling there's a bit of a shortage of build people on TC. Fortunately this project overlaps nicely with my day job, so I just treat it as educational. Yes, hopefully with get around to size-optimizing the container, maybe even automating building it.
  3. @Thulium I got 2) to work, in a slightly roundabout way. I built my own, but the install failed just like it failed with yours because dpkg couldn't find systemd. At least when I try to install it, if systemd is not present the install will outright fail, I don't know how to tell dpkg to ignore the post-setup. Docker containers by design don't allow systemd at all, I think there are ways to force it in but this is not how containers should work. BUT, I realized I could unpack a deb file, strip out the systemd config contents, repack, and install, and voila, it works. Next step is to try this with your builds so I don't have to run my own When I ran TC it failed with some missing dependencies (mariadb-dev for ex), and also there were no sql files in the package so the server couldn't self-scaffold. I'm guessing the scope of your builld is just the executables? I managed to fix these and ... I got my dockerized TC to work! Your build script was essential for me to figure out how to get here, I'm going to write up a guide and put it on github. My plan is to explain how to setup a server from scratch on a linux cloud box, I'd love to base it on the builds you're doing, so it's one less thing for people to have to do. I don't suppose these's a convenient 3.3.5 data dump out there that I can also point to so people don't have to extract?
  4. Hey @Thulium First, thanks for this project, I'm running my first build of the server now (it still takes forever!) Second, I'm trying to get a docker image of TrinityCore going, and it would be a huge step forward if I could get a reliable package build of all the TrinityCore binaries. Unfortunately, the builds I'm getting from your package repo seem to rely on systemd to work, so I cannot run them inside a Docker container. So, now I'm trying to figure out how to build this project without systemd. The build tool you're using is new to me, and I can't find anything obvious in the build config in the trinitycore-recipes repo that includes systemd, other than the daemon restart command in postinst. Do you have any suggestions for how to remove systemd from the build? Thanks again
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